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ASA members unite for a special week in the BVIsASA members unite for a special week in the BVIs Lots of people sail the British Virgin Islands every year, but not many get to do it in quite the same style as the 2014 ASA Member's Event, which took place March 1-8. For...

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Four Ways to Get Sailing ExperienceFour Ways to Get Sailing Experience “You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose.” ― Dr. Seuss, Oh, the Places You'll Go! What the wise...

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Getting your Sailing Education is Easier Than Ever!Getting your Sailing Education is Easier Than Ever! A good education combines practical experience with study - and nowhere is that more true than in the world of sailing. As important as it is to understand how a boat works,...

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Take a Coastal Navigation Sailing Course and Build ConfidenceTake a Coastal Navigation Sailing Course and Build... Long gone are the days when a sailor cruising alongside an unfamiliar coast had nothing but their compass and the principles of dead reckoning to go by. The age of GPS and...

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Five Essential Bareboat Charter SkillsFive Essential Bareboat Charter Skills Modernist author and noted sea enthusiast, Ernest Hemingway, once said, "The sea is the same as it has been before men ever went on it in boats." While that may be true, a...

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Your Photo Could Be On the Cover of Our New Book!Your Photo Could Be On the Cover of Our New Book! In 2014, ASA will release Bareboat Cruising Made Easy, the latest in our line of cutting-edge sailing books. But before the book can be published, we need to find the perfect...

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VIDEO: Trailer for Maidentrip, documentary about Laura DekkerVIDEO: Trailer for Maidentrip, documentary about Laura... For years here on the ASA blog we followed Laura Dekker's amazing round-the-world sailing adventures. The Dutch teenager battled the legal system, contended with public opinion,...

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ASA's 30th Anniversary Caribbean Getaway Sweepstakes!ASA's 30th Anniversary Caribbean Getaway Sweepstakes! Join us to help improve the lives of children in the Caribbean, and you could win a 6-night stay at Conde Nast award-winning Rosalie Bay Resort in beautiful Dominica, complete...

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Alternative Energy in the Sailing WorldAlternative Energy in the Sailing World Guest post from Sailors for the Sea. By:Hilary Wiech, Communications Manager and Annie Brett, Program Director Renewable energy is a hot and sometimes controversial topic...

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Upcoming ASA events at the America's CupUpcoming ASA events at the America's Cup The America's Cup, one of the world's greatest sporting spectacles, and the biggest event in competitive sailing, is underway right now in San Francisco! Check the schedule...

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Take a Coastal Navigation Sailing Course and Build Confidence

Category : Standards

sailing croatiaLong gone are the days when a sailor cruising alongside an unfamiliar coast had nothing but their compass and the principles of dead reckoning to go by. The age of GPS and electronic chartplotters is here, and with NOAA’s recent announcement that it would be discontinuing paper charts, it is clear that navigation has undergone a titanic shift.

Far from making the fundamental principles of navigation obsolete, however, these changes reinforce just how important they are. GPS and other revolutionary electronic aids have greatly enhanced the sailor’s ability to get their position and travel safely, but they are of no use unless that sailor understands how to navigate. Here’s an example: On a recent ASA flotilla in Croatia, stormy weather had caused the marinas to fill up with boats looking to escape the rain, meaning that the ASA boats had to find somewhere else to anchor. By consulting the charts and cruising guide, they identified a protected bay a few miles off.

plottingUsing a combination of GPS data and pencil-on-paper chartplotting, they figured out the best route and the obstacles they would need to avoid. They also considered the direction and force of the wind in order to avoid a lee shore. Armed with this information, and keeping a sharp lookout, they navigated safely into the idyllic bay, where they found mooring balls and spent a peaceful night far from the overcrowded marina.

The lesson? Understanding coastal navigation counts. So where can you learn these skills? So glad you asked! The answer is at your local ASA affiliated sailing school. ASA 105 is the Coastal Navigation standard. In this course you learn the theory of navigation, including:

  • Reading charts
  • Using the instruments on board
  • Understanding tide and current tables
  • Converting courses and bearings for true, magnetic, and compass directions
  • Dead reckoning
  • Plotting a course

Not only are these essential skills for any serious mariner, they also come with a genuine sense of achievement. For hundreds of years the world’s great explorers, admirals, pirates, and singlehanders have practiced them. So can you. The feeling of fulfillment that comes from plotting a course and sailing it is second-to-none.

ASA 105 is taught at sailing schools around the country, and is often paired with ASA 106 (Advanced Coastal Cruising), which allows you to put the theory into practice. For more details on what you will learn, click here.

To sign up, find your local ASA school and ask when their next Coastal Navigation course is. Click here to find sailing schools in your area.

ASA partners with NASA: “We will sail the Sea of Tranquility by 2020″

Category : Standards

For Immediate Release – April 1, 2014

Following the recent announcement of worldwide partnerships with leading boat manufacturer Beneteau and peer-to-peer marketplace Boatbound, the American Sailing Association (ASA) is proud to embark on its latest alliance.

In a press conference at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA, the ASA and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) launched a new strategic partnership to increase awareness of sailing opportunities on the moon, vowing to establish a thriving lunar sailing community by 2020.

moon

An artist’s rendering of the scintillating scenery that awaits sailors on the moon.

“For too long, recreational sailing on the moon has been all but impossible for the average American,” said NASA director Charles Bolden. “Fears regarding high cost, out-of-the-way location, or lack of breathable air may have made consumers reluctant, but we want to remind them that this is still their closest orbital body! Our multi-stage collaboration will change the perception of moonsailing as an elitist sport available only to those with advanced astrophysics degrees.”

The initial phase of the project will see Titan rockets transport ASA-certified sailing instructors to the lunar surface, where they will establish sailing schools in the Sea of Serenity and Bay of Rainbows, with further expansion planned for the Lake of Time and the Sea of Fecundity. Offshore Passagemaking courses will be held in the Ocean of Storms, weather permitting.

“The sailing conditions will be different from what we’re used to here on Earth,” said ASA Online Communications Director Ben Miller. “For instance, instead of flotation devices, sailors will wear weighted vests. And with no atmosphere, wind, or water, the moon presents an intriguing navigational challenge to mariners.”

nasa

Our team works around the clock to find the algorithm for maximum fun!

ASA will develop a lunar curriculum to supplement its existing courses, bringing the same Earthly standard of excellence to the field of extraterrestrial voyaging. A new textbook, Moonsailing Made Easy, will be accompanied by pamphlets such as “Understanding Solar Flares” and “I’m Afraid I Can’t Do That, Dave: Using Your Onboard Systems.”

Certifications offered will include “Anchoring in Zero G,” “Basic Thruster Repair,” and “Introduction to Flag-Planting.”

FindMyCharter.com, the official charter partner of ASA, will offer a variety of attractive vacation packages, including a 7-day crewed charter on the Sea of Vapors, shore excursions to the towering Mons Hadley, and day sails in the Lake of Sorrow. All charters are available in Premium (Sunlight) or Budget (Darkness).

“Forget the crowded anchorages of Earth, and let the warm, radioactive solar breeze wash over you,” says Miller. “There truly is nothing like a sailing charter vacation. Relax with that special someone and enjoy a vacuum-sealed refreshment, or bring the whole family on an adventure of exploration. What better place for your next getaway than a cold, distant rock, utterly devoid of life?”

A kickoff event featuring Jimmy Buffett is planned for Cape Canaveral on April 1, 2020.

ASA members unite for a special week in the BVIs

Category : Members

arabellaLots of people sail the British Virgin Islands every year, but not many get to do it in quite the same style as the 2014 ASA Member’s Event, which took place March 1-8. For a week, our members were treated to an island cruise aboard the luxury yacht Arabella–a 156 foot sailing schooner, complete with 3 masts, 8 sails, a jacuzzi, and 20 guest cabins. Formerly owned by Top Gun star Kelly McGillis, Arabella is a seafaring masterpiece.

As the flagship of ASA affiliate Manhattan Sailing School, Arabella combines the beauty of hands-on sailing with the luxury of a mega-yacht. Through the course of the week, we not only got to enjoy the islands, but were also treated to workshops and master classes led by ASA instructors and Arabella crewmembers. Read on to hear the highlights, and stay tuned to ASA social media, as there may be more opportunities to sail on Arabella in the future!

supDeparture and First Stops

Leaving Road Town, Tortola, Arabella sailed up to the Baths for the first Caribbean snorkel and swim of the trip. After a dip and some lunch, she sailed downwind to Marina Cay where we went ashore and took a hike up to the top of the island, which affords stunning views over the Sir Francis Drake Channel.

After breakfast on Monday, the crew weighed anchor and sailed for North Sound, home of the famous Bitter End Yacht Club. There they spent a “play day,” with all of Arabella’s considerable complement of water toys available for use. Between kayaking, stand-up paddleboarding, snorkeling, swimming, relaxing under a palm tree with a book, and lounging at the Bitter End, there was no shortage of fun to be had. The time at Bitter End was capped off on Tuesday night with the obligatory Pirate Party!

Cooper Island and Jost Van Dyke

Sailing out of North Sound in the morning, Arabella made for Cooper Island, passing the Dog Islands on the way. After lunch and a stop ashore at the Cooper Island Beach Club, we sailed on for Soper’s Hole, where we spent the night. (The Caribbean is home to some of the best place-names in the world, by the way.) Onboard, we were able to experiment with Arabella’s state-of-the-art joystick helm, take advantage of the jacuzzi, and fine-tune our conch-blowing skills.

The next day took Arabella to the famous island of Jost Van Dyke, where we engaged in the Caribbean tradition of having the tender drop everyone off away from the beach and swim to shore. This is how you get your “soggy dollars” for the notorious Soggy Dollar Bar, inventor of the Painkiller cocktail. After an afternoon at the Soggy Dollar, the nighttime belonged to Foxy’s, perhaps the most famous of Caribbean bars.

bowspritNorman Island and Home Again

Due to the previous day’s “festivities,” Friday got off to a leisurely start. Eventually Arabella made her way to the Bight in Norman Island, which has world-class snorkeling, and is also excellent for kayaking and small boat sailing. Dinner that evening was served on board Arabella, in her glorious salon that can seat 48 people. Then it was onshore for one more infamous Caribbean bar, Willie T’s. This floating “food & grog” establishment is known for all kinds of shenanigans, but you know what they say – what happens in the Bight stays in the Bight.

Unfortunately, all things must come to an end, and so on Saturday it was back to Road Town and time to say goodbye. After a spectacular week on board a spectacular boat and in a spectacular setting, the only thing left to do was start plotting how we could do it all again!

Keep up to date with the latest ASA news on our Facebook page so that you can join us!

Four Ways to Get Sailing Experience

Category : Schools

“You have brains in your head.
You have feet in your shoes.
You can steer yourself any direction you choose.”
― Dr. Seuss, Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

sailing experienceWhat the wise poet demonstrated about life itself is equally true in sailing: When it comes to where, when, and how you get sailing experience, it’s entirely up to you. The options are more various and appealing now than ever before. Whether you want to become intimately familiar with your local waterways close to home, or seek out fair weather and relaxation in the tropics, or anything in between, those choices are available to you.

Most people who enjoy sailing don’t own boats. That should not stop you from participating in the sport, improving your skills, and exploring new places. We’ll run down some of the ways you can gain sailing experience here, even if you don’t own a boat:

1. Take a sailing course at your local ASA school. Find a school here, and get in touch to see what courses they’re offering. If you’re new to sailing, you’ll start with ASA 101. If you’ve already got some sailing chops, you might be interested in higher level courses. Either way, you’ll be out sailing on your local body of water with expert ASA instructors.

open sea2. Take a “destination” sailing course through ASA. Many of our schools are either located in, or teach periodic courses in, exotic locales. They can be found throughout the Caribbean, from Puerto Rico to the BVIs and down to Central America, and in numerous other countries around the world. Contact your local school to see if they have destination courses, or look at at the ASA schools based outside of the US.

3. Go on a skippered or bareboat charter. If you’ve taken courses through ASA 104 (Bareboat Cruising), you’re likely excited about the prospect of chartering. This is a great way to get the cruising experience you can’t get close to home. On a skippered or bareboat charter, you live aboard the boat, sail it from place to place, and practice skills such as mooring and anchoring that you might not use in your local marina. Not to mention, it’s a fantastic vacation. To learn more about charters and book yours, visit Find My Charter, ASA’s official charter partner.

4. Practice your sailing skills with a local club or school. Many ASA schools also run sailing clubs, host races, and have boat rental or timeshare programs. When you don’t own a boat and you need access to one, your sailing school is often a great resource. Stay in touch and let us help you keep your skills sharp.

From Landlubber to Old Salt: Beginner Sailing Tips

Category : Schools

studying with coconutSailing season is almost upon us, and that means a lot of people will get their first chance to go out on the water. Here are some beginner sailing tips for making sure you have a safe, fun, and successful voyage.

1. Pick a day with favorable conditions and dress appropriately. Depending on your area, good conditions come in a variety of shapes and sizes. Generally, you want fairly calm seas and lighter rather than stronger winds. Sunshine and 0% chance of precipitation is a plus! Remember that it is often windier and cooler out on the water than it is on shore, so dress appropriately.

2. Have the right boat. When you’re learning, a smaller, more responsive boat makes it easier to understand the dynamics of sailing. ASA 101 courses are taught on 22′ keelboats, which are bigger and sturdier than a dinghy, but small enough that you can really feel the forces of wind and water acting on the boat.

3. Be aware of the boom. The boom is the big, heavy bar at the foot of the mainsail. It swings across the boat whenever you tack or gybe, and you really don’t want it to hit you. It can injure you and even knock you overboard, but it’s easy to avoid as long as you’re paying attention. Whenever you hear talk of tacking or gybing, make sure you’re down in the cockpit, well out of the way. Experienced sailors also know how to control the movement of the boom, mainly by “sheeting in” when preparing for a tack or gybe, as allowing it to move freely causes unnecessary wear on the boat. By a combination of common sense safety and good sail-handling, you can ensure that there’s no danger or unpleasantness.

sails up!4. Go with someone who knows what they’re doing. We recommend an ASA instructor. An experienced, trained teacher of sailing will make a world of difference–the difference between a frustrating, unfulfilling experience, and a safe, fun, highly educational experience.

5. Know some basic sailing terms before you go. (We’ve previously covered important sailing terms here.) Learning basic terms such as “tack” and “gybe,” the difference between port and starboard, and the points of sail, is recommended. This will make it easier for you to contribute to sailing the vessel. Once you’re safely back at the dock you can expand your nautical vocabulary to include key phrases such as “beer,” “rum,” and “more beer and rum, please.”

If you do these five things, you’re setting yourself up to have a great time sailing, whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned plougher of the high seas. The best way to combine them all into one experience is to sign up for an ASA sailing course at one of our 300 schools nationwide. Find a sailing school near you here.

Your Photo Could Be On the Cover of Our New Book!

Category : American Sailing Association, Standards

bcme photoIn 2014, ASA will release Bareboat Cruising Made Easy, the latest in our line of cutting-edge sailing books. But before the book can be published, we need to find the perfect cover photo.

We’re leaving no stone unturned in the search for the best photos depicting the bareboat cruising lifestyle, and we want our members & fans to be in on the fun! We have room for one outstanding photo on the front cover and several photos on the back cover. Do you have a fantastic charter photo that you’d like to see grace BCME? Then send it our way, and you never know what could happen!

Should your photo be chosen for the front or back cover, you’ll receive photo credit, a free copy of the book, and your work will be immortalized on a book that thousands and thousands of sailors will use!

Some guidelines to keep in mind:

  • Vertical shots preferred (horizontal may work, though)
  • Should depict the fun lifestyle of bareboat chartering
  • Should feature a sailboat
  • People having fun in the shot strongly preferred
  • You must own the photo or have the right to give it to us (See official rules below for details)
  • High resolution, preferably portrait size (Minimum 2 MB file size)

If you have a great chartering photo that fits this description, it could be the one we’re looking for.

Two ways to submit:

Email your photo to bmiller AT asa DOT com.

Post your photo on our Facebook page.

About the books:

ASA’s series of instructional sailing books set the industry standard. The series begins with Sailing Made Easy, the accompanying text to our ASA 101 Basic Sailing course, and continues with Coastal Cruising Made Easy, which addresses more advanced navigation and sailing skills from ASA 103. These books were called “best in class” by Sailing Magazine and are some of the most popular sailing guides on the market.

Bareboat Cruising Made Easy will accompany ASA 104, one of our most in-demand courses. ASA 104 is the Bareboat Cruising certification level, a credential that is recognized around the world and allows you to skipper your own charter boat. For many sailors, a bareboat charter in the Caribbean or Mediterranean is the ultimate sailing goal, and ASA 104 is a big step toward making it happen.


OFFICIAL RULES

How to enter: Post a photo on the American Sailing Association’s Facebook timeline with a brief description. Or, email your photo to bm@asa.com.

Multiple submissions are allowed.

By submitting a photograph to ASA for the purpose of the cover photo search for Bareboat Cruising Made Easy, you agree to the following:

In consideration of my engagement as a model and/or photographer I do hereby voluntarily authorize and give permission to THE AMERICAN SAILING ASSOCIATION to the exclusive use of: photographs, video and digital reproductions in any form of my person or personal property. In submitting my photography, I certify that I have the right to grant, and do grant, THE AMERICAN SAILING ASSOCIATION permission to reproduce and use it in perpetuity.

They will be used for the promotion of THE AMERICAN SAILING ASSOCIATION and FINDMYCHARTER.COM. Uses include, but are not limited to: books, ads, brochures, publications, media broadcasts, the ASA website, and educational materials.

Through entering the ASA 30th Anniversary Photo Contest, I hereby grant, release and assign to THE AMERICAN SAILING ASSOCIATION any and all claims of right whatsoever in and to all photographs or printed materials of the undersigned.

I hereby give all clearances, copyright and otherwise, for use of my likeness and the likeness of any person depicted in the photograph submitted, in ASA promotional materials. I expressly release and indemnify AMERICAN SAILING ASSOCIATION and its officers, employees, agents and designees from any and all claims known and unknown arising out of or in any way connected with the above granted uses and representations.

VIDEO: Trailer for “Maidentrip,” documentary about Laura Dekker

Category : Uncategorized

laura dekker maidentripFor years here on the ASA blog we followed Laura Dekker’s amazing round-the-world sailing adventures. The Dutch teenager battled the legal system, contended with public opinion, and braved the seven seas on her own. Now filmmaker Jillian Schlesinger is telling the tale.

In case you’re unfamiliar with Laura’s story, here it is in a nutshell: Laura made her mind up at 13 to undertake a solo sailing voyage, and departed on her round-the-world journey in 2010 at the age of 14. This came after a long battle with Dutch authorities who did not want her to take the trip, and even tried to take custody of her. Rather than try to sail non-stop and go for speed, Laura stopped frequently over the next two years as she made her way around the globe, explaining that her purpose was to experience new places and cultures, not to set any sailing records.

She completed her circumnavigation safely in 2012 when she sailed into Simpson Bay at the Caribbean Island of St. Maarten.

This new documentary uses footage shot by Dekker, ranging from beautiful seascapes and personal reflection to thrilling life-and-death sailing adventure. Even in these brief two minutes you get a glimpse of Laura’s charisma, fortitude, and independent, willful mind. The film will be playing at film festivals across the US from January to April. Watch the trailer below, then see click here to see where you can catch it.

Can’t see the video? Click here.

ASA’s 30th Anniversary Caribbean Getaway Sweepstakes!

Category : American Sailing Association

Join us to help improve the lives of children in the Caribbean, and you could win a 6-night stay at Conde Nast award-winning Rosalie Bay Resort in beautiful Dominica, complete with round-trip air travel from San Juan, Puerto Rico to Dominica on Seaborne Airlines. Entries close at midnight, November 30, 2013.

Click here to enter!

rosalie bay resortDominica, in the Eastern Caribbean, is an island of stunning natural beauty, home to great sailing, swimming, hiking, and diving. At the eco-boutique Rosalie Bay Resort, you’ll find yourself in a picturesque sanctuary blending nature with chic amenities.

ASA is partnering with Rosalie Bay Resort and Seaborne Airlines to support the mission of Hands Across the Sea, a non-profit organization dedicated to raising literacy levels in the Caribbean. When you donate to Hands Across the Sea through this page you’ll not only be automatically entered in our Grand Prize sweepstakes, you’ll be helping Hands provide much-needed books and literacy tools to children throughout the Caribbean. ASA will match all donations of $30 or more, up to a total of $1,000, in honor of its 30th anniversary year.

In addition to our Grand Prize winner, five entrants will win high-quality posters of the movie All Is Lost featuring Robert Redford and signed by director J.C. Chandor. The top three supporters (by amount of donation) will be given a beautiful marine-themed, gallery-quality handmade platter from Salt Marsh Pottery as a token of our appreciation.

Just play the video to see how your donation to Hands Across the Sea helps! (If you can’t see the video, click here to view on Youtube.) Then click here to enter for your chance to win!

About the Rosalie Bay Resort

Named the No. 2 resort in the Caribbean in the Condé Nast Traveler 2013 Readers’ Choice Awards, Rosalie Bay is an eco-boutique and wellness resort nestled in the foothills of the Morne Trois Pitons where the Rosalie River meets the black sand beaches of the Atlantic Ocean. Rosalie Bay is a pioneer in its environmental efforts with the largest wind turbine in the region and founding Dominica’s sea turtle conservation program.

The hand-built sanctuary seamlessly blends into its 22-acre surroundings with 28 spacious rooms and suites, waterfront spa, wellness program and organic cuisine. Stunning natural beauty and modern touches work in perfect harmony to create a vacation that is simply magical.

Alternative Energy in the Sailing World

Category : American Sailing Association, Sailboats

Guest post from Sailors for the Sea.
By:Hilary Wiech, Communications Manager and Annie Brett, Program Director


Renewable energy is a hot and sometimes controversial topic on land, but within the sailing world wind generators can sometimes be seen as old news.

aoki yacht asa solar panelsIt may seem silly to talk about renewable energy in the sailing world – aren’t sailboats powered by the wind after all? But look a little more closely, and for each sailboat on the water, there are a slew of energy consuming generators, outboards and batteries making sure we can get from point A to B. With climate change an increasingly pressing concern for the oceans and the environment, reducing our use of fossil fuels is critical. That being said, some of the best arguments for alternative energy sources are purely practical.

The cruising community, for instance, has long embraced renewable energy as a way to reduce costs and help make long passages possible on small amounts of diesel fuel. Solar panels and wind generators are almost ubiquitous on live-aboards, allowing cruisers to maintain battery banks while far away from traditional energy sources. Pictured at left is ASA instructor Yoh Aoki’s Zen 24 yacht, which makes us of a variety of renewable power sources.

Here at Sailors for the Sea we have noticed a big increase in the use of renewable energy with racing sailors as well. More efficient and cost-effective technologies mean that many of the same benefits the cruising community has long understood are now workable for racers. Whether switching a race committee boat to biodiesel or sailing around the world without a drop of diesel, race organizers are looking towards alternative energy sources. The America’s Cup, The Atlantic Cup, and the Vendee Globe are three regattas that are each taking a different approach to reducing their environmental footprint with the use of alternative energy.

America’s Cup – Alternative Energy supporting a large regatta venue

Race organizers at the America’s Cup have taken a strong stance on sustainability with a commitment to running every event in accordance to our Clean Regattas certification criteria and helping us create a stringent Platinum Level certification. The on-shore footprint of the America’s Cup is very large, with multiple venues scattered throughout the city of San Francisco and an anticipated hundreds of thousands of visitors during the three months of racing. Race organizers have committed to holding a carbon neutral event, and to achieve this they will utilize renewable energy in different ways:

  • Solar Panels: Past America’s Cup World Series events have seen organizers turn to solar power for some of their energy needs. Security lights powered by solar panels will reduce electrical use for a light that needs to be very bright and on 12 hours a day. Solar panels will cover the top of the sound stage and will generate enough power to boom the announcer’s voices over the large crowds.
  • Biodiesel: When The America’s Cup is unable to use shore power, and the use of generators are necessary using biodiesel will help reduce their fossil fuel usage and emissions.

Atlantic Cup – Renewable technologies for short distance and inshore racing

The Atlantic Cup, a regatta currently being run for its third year, has always received Gold level Clean Regattas certification. Race organizers require that every team use a form of alternative energy and through their sponsors assist teams with making the switch.

  • Hydro-generators: Many boats in the Class 40 circuit use hydro-generators to charge their batteries. Much like an upside-down wind generator, they have become popular in recent years as their increasing efficiency and reduced drag means they barely affect a boat’s speed. (Watch video below)
  • Solar Panels: Many boats are equipped with solar panels to charge their batteries.
    Bio-diesel: When the engines must be run (hopefully only to and from dock) race organizers supply biodiesel for each boat.

Want to see more about renewable energy in the Atlantic Cup? Click here to view on Youtube.

Vendee Globe – Around the world with no fossil fuel
acciona vendee globe
The Vendee Globe is a grueling solo round the world race from west to east via the three major capes -Good Hope, Leeuwin, and the Horn. In years past, about half the fleet does not make it across the finish line. For many years, racers have relied on some form of renewable energy to make it all the way around the world, typically a combination of solar panels and diesel fuel used to keep their batteries charged. However, this year one sailor set out with the goal of completing the race without using a single drop of diesel. Javier Sanso onTeam ACCIONA created a 100 percent ecopowered boat built to compete with the best in class.

  • A combination of solar panels, wind generators, and hydro generators were used onboard to charge batteries.
  • An electrical engine, a first in the history of the race, was used in place of a standard diesel engine. Team ACCIONA has to ask for the race rules to be changed to allow for the electrical engine, opening possibilities for the future.

If Sanso had completed the race, he would have been the first to do so without using fossil fuels. Unfortunately his keel broke and the boat flipped with approximately ¼ of the race left. For more information on Javier Sanso’s eco-friendly campaign watch the video below and read The New York Times article “In Race Around World, Boat Relies on the Power of Wind, Water and Sun.”

See more about renewable energy use in the Vendee Globe Race. Click here to view on Youtube.

Upcoming ASA events at the America’s Cup

Category : Schools

ac logo
The America’s Cup, one of the world’s greatest sporting spectacles, and the biggest event in competitive sailing, is underway right now in San Francisco! Check the schedule below to see the upcoming events ASA has going on, and watch this space for updates!

(Are you an ASA school hosting a Bay Area America’s Cup event? Contact us to get it on the schedule.)

To get more information and join any of the events listed below, click here.
ac racing
America’s Cup/ Louis Vuitton Cup Spectator Cruise Dates:

Louis Vuitton Finals
Sunday August 18, 2013

11:30 am – 3:30 pm
$145 per ticket.
Includes California Continental Brunch. Beer, Wine, and Soft Drinks may be purchased aboard.

Red Bull Youth Cup
Sunday September 1, 2013

11:00 am – 2:00 pm
$75 per ticket.
Includes California Continental Brunch. Beer, Wine, and Soft Drinks may be purchased aboard.

America’s Cup
Sunday September 8, 2013
11:30 am 3:30 pm
$195 per ticket.
Includes California Continental Brunch. Beer, Wine, and Soft Drinks may be purchased aboard.

Click here for more info and reservations!